Groundwater Treatment at the Rio Vista Intake Pump Station

Groundwater Treatment at the Rio Vista Intake Pump Station

T&U Wells PFAS Treatment and Saugus 1 and 2 VOC Treatment Facility at the Rio Vista Intake Pump Station

SCV Water is continuing its commitment to restoring local groundwater Reliability with the new T7, U4 and U6 Groundwater Treatment and Saugus 1 and 2 VOC Treatment System Project located at the existing Rio Vista Intake Pump Station Facility. This project ensures a local, reliable source of groundwater for SCV Water’s customers and reduces reliance on costly imported water.

The $17.8 million treatment project will restore up to 3,450 gallons per minute (5,565 Acre-feet per year) at the existing T7, U4 and U6 wells that have been offline due to PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) detection. A new treatment system will also be constructed to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the existing Saugus 1 and 2 wells.

The existing Rio Vista Intake Pump Station Facility is currently used by SCV Water for various production and operational functions. It primarily pumps imported state water to the Rio Vista Treatment Plant, which is located approximately 1.3 miles northeast of the site. Groundwater from the existing T7, U4 and U6 wells will be diverted to the facility for treatment and disinfection before it is put into our water distribution system.

Project Highlights

  • Treats groundwater from the existing T7, U4 and U6 wells, which are currently offline due to PFAS detection
  • Treats volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from groundwater produced at the existing Saugus 1 and 2 wells
  • The T7, U4 and U6 wells are permitted to produce up to 3,450 gallons per minute
  • Restores enough water to serve up to 5,000 families annually
  • Estimated project cost: $17.8 million
  • Facility includes a new disinfection building, four ion-exchange treatment vessels, 2 Granular Activated Carbon Treatment vessels, pumps, motors and ancillary equipment, all to be constructed within the facility property
  • Well rehabilitation and pump upgrades at the existing T7 and U6 well sites
  • Minor pipeline work will be required within Bouquet Canyon Road and Newhall Ranch Road

Project Schedule

  • Approximate Construction: June 2024 – December 2025
  • Work will be conducted between the hours of 7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

What to expect during construction:

  • Most of the work will take place within SCV Water existing Rio Vista Intake Pump Station Facility located near the Lowes’ shopping center at 25401 Bouquet Canyon Road.
  • Well rehab and upgrade work will occur at the existing T7 well site located near Duane Hart Park in the River Village community (26401 Riverrock Way, Santa Clarita, CA 91351)
  • Well Rehab and upgrade work will occur at the existing U6 well site located within the Villa Metro community, adjacent to Greenbriar Mobile Estates.
  • Minor pipeline work will occur within Bouquet Canyon Road near the Rio Vista Pump Sation Facility and at various locations along Newhall Ranch Road, between Bouquet Canyon Road and Millhouse Road.
  • Businesses within the Lowe’s shopping center will remain open during construction.
  • Residents and businesses nearby may hear routine construction sounds, such as trucks entering and exiting the facility, equipment, and machines.
  • Temporary lane closures may be required along Bouquet Canyon Road and Newhall Ranch Road to complete minor pipeline work.
  • Once the facility is complete, nearby residents will not hear sounds/noise at the site.
  • There will be no traffic impacts once the project is complete.
  • There are no anticipated water shutoffs during this project.
T7 Well, near Duane Hart Park
​​​​​in River Village

 

U6 Well, in Villa Metro (left side, red roofs) adjacent to Greenbriar Mobile Estates (right side)

 

Funding

The project is eligible to receive up to $12.6 million in grant funding. Grant funding will be provided in part by the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund through an agreement with the State Water Resources Control Board. California’s Drinking Water State Revolving Fund is capitalized through a variety of funding sources, including grants from the United States Environmental Protection Agency and state bond proceeds. Grant funding will also be provided in part from the Water Quality, Supply, and Infrastructure Improvement Act of 2014 and through an agreement with the State Department of Water Resources.